CRIMINAL DEFENSE:

                     STATE AND FEDERAL

 State Criminal Defense

As a former Assistant District Attorney, I have screened cases for prosecution and have made decisions on which cases and charges to present for indictment.  In addition, I have handled almost every type of case in state court.  The details matter. 

 

My experience provides me with unique insight into spotting issues and recognizing the potential challenges that prosecutors might face.  I also have extensive jury trial experience ranging from DWI and drug cases to robbery and murder.  As a Raleigh-Durham criminal lawyer, I can assist you with all types of state criminal charges.

As a former Assistant District Attorney, I have screened cases for prosecution and have made decisions on which cases and charges to present for indictment.  In addition, I have handled almost every type of case in state court.  The details matter. 

 

My experience provides me with unique insight into spotting issues and recognizing the potential challenges that prosecutors might face.  I also have extensive jury trial experience ranging from DWI and drug cases to robbery and murder.  As a Raleigh-Durham criminal lawyer, I can assist you with all types of state criminal charges.

 Federal Criminal Defense

In federal court, the criminal process usually begins with an indictment or complaint.  Following arrest, a defendant will have an initial appearance before a United States Magistrate Judge in which the person will learn about the nature of the charges, the possible penalties, and his/her rights in the system.  If the Government requests pre-trial detention, then the defendant would have a detention hearing (usually three business days later) in which the defendant would have the opportunity to request conditions of release.  After the detention hearing, the next step in the process is the arraignment.  The defendant must then decide how to respond to the charges.  If the defendant pleads not guilty, then there would be a trial.  If the defendant pleads guilty, then the case would proceed to a sentencing hearing.

 

As a former Special Assistant United States Attorney, I have prosecuted federal drug and related gun cases in the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force unit.  From my experience, I know the key issues to identify in preparing for a detention hearing.  In addition, I will help clients make an informed decision about how to respond to the Government's allegations.  If a case proceeds to sentencing, I would work with clients in navigating the complex United States Sentencing Guidelines.

In federal court, the criminal process usually begins with an indictment or complaint.  Following arrest, a defendant will have an initial appearance before a United States Magistrate Judge in which the person will learn about the nature of the charges, the possible penalties, and his/her rights in the system.  If the Government requests pre-trial detention, then the defendant would have a detention hearing (usually three business days later) in which the defendant would have the opportunity to request conditions of release.  After the detention hearing, the next step in the process is the arraignment.  The defendant must then decide how to respond to the charges.  If the defendant pleads not guilty, then there would be a trial.  If the defendant pleads guilty, then the case would proceed to a sentencing hearing.

 

As a former Special Assistant United States Attorney, I have prosecuted federal drug and related gun cases in the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force unit.  From my experience, I know the key issues to identify in preparing for a detention hearing.  In addition, I will help clients make an informed decision about how to respond to the Government's allegations.  If a case proceeds to sentencing, I would work with clients in navigating the complex United States Sentencing Guidelines.

CONTACT PATRICK B. WEEDE, A RALEIGH-DURHAM CRIMINAL LAWYER, FOR A FREE CONSULTATION


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